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medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.
the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.
A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.
Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.
The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)
Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years
The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)
A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt
7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait
7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province. 
Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.

the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.

A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.

Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.

The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)

Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years

The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)

A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt

7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait

7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province.

Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.

posted:2 days ago, 71980 notes
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zayndehaan:

marvel movies that need to be made, stat.

posted:2 days ago, 17311 notes
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ecklecticsoul:

Childish Gambino Interview At The Breakfast Club Power 105.1 

[x]

posted:2 days ago, 25461 notes
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(Source: fancyjoltik)

posted:3 days ago, 25338 notes
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posted:3 days ago, 135 notes
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lisabeam:

fahbulus:

taking selfies with my friends like

image

aren’t those the guys from scrubs?

posted:3 days ago, 208421 notes
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mickeyandcompany:

Concept art and animation panels for Treasure Planet 2

Before Treasure Planet was shown in cinemas, Thomas Schumacher, then president of Walt Disney Feature Animation, mentioned the possibilities of having direct-to-video releases for Treasure Planet as well as a television series. He stated that they already had “a story and some storyboards and concepts up and a script for what a sequel to [Treasure Planet] could be,” and that they also had a “notion” of what the series would be.

Director Jun Falkenstein and screenwriter Evan Spiliotopoulos began early development on Treasure Planet 2. In the sequel, Jim Hawkins and Kate, his love interest and classmate at the Royal Interstellar Academy, must team with Long John Silver to stop the villainous Ironbeard from freeing the inmates of Botany Bay Prison Asteroid. Willem Dafoe was set to voice Ironbeard. The sequel was canceled when Treasure Planet disappointed at the box office.

(Sources: x, x)

posted:3 days ago, 10973 notes
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For the times they are a-changin’
(Watchmen opening credits)

(Source: bellamyclarkee)

posted:3 days ago, 4553 notes
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peashooter85:

The Great Carrot Deception of World War II.

During the Battle of Britain, a battle in which the German Luftwaffe (air force) expected to simply sweep the RAF (Royal Air Force) out of the skies, the Germans were baffled as to how the British were able to put up such a staunch defense.  What was most confusing of all was that the British seemed to know where all their attack were coming from.  British pilots were even able to intercept and shoot down German bombers in the pitch black of night. 

What the Germans didn’t know was that the British had an ace up their sleeve.  British radar technology had advanced to the point that British fighter pilots could find and shoot down enemy bombers directed by an onboard radar interception unit.  Knowledge of Britain’s radar technology was top secret, and the Brits certainly didn’t want the Germans to find out.  The British War Ministry quickly cooked up a cartoonish and bizarre cover story for their success.

The Ministry single out a successful pilot named John Cunningham for a unique propaganda campaign.  John Cunningham, nicknamed “Cat Eyes” had shot down 19 German bombers at night using the new onboard radar system.  Cunningham was also a man loved to eat carrots, sometimes eating dozens at a time in one sitting. Thus the British War Ministry cooked up an ridiculous carrot of their own; the reason for the RAF’s night fighting success was because British pilots ate carrots.  Chalk full of Vitamin A, the carrots gave British pilots almost superhuman night vision.  To cement their story, a propaganda campaign was started to convince the British people that carrots were good for eyesight.  They printed posters claiming carrots gave people nightvision, necessary for survival in blackouts and bombing raids.  They advertised on the radio, they printed leaflets, they even introduced a special carrot pop for children. 

While today scientific studies prove that carrots, at best, might improve vision a little bit, the propaganda campaign was certainly pumping out a steady stream of over-exaggerated BS.  However, the British public certainly bought it.  More importantly to some degree the Germans bought it as well.  While it is unknown if German High Command accepted the “carrot theory”, there are recorded instanced of German Luftwaffe pilots eating an excess of carrots to improve their vision.

After the Battle of Britain the carrot campaign continued to the point that even other Allied Powers were printing their own carrot propaganda.  Today the myth is still alive and well, and millions of children around the world are forced to eat their carrots due to World War II propaganda.

posted:3 days ago, 6085 notes
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fini-mun:

Dude check out this shark

fini-mun:

Dude check out this shark

(Source: shalamakingfaces)

posted:3 days ago, 74607 notes